NaNoWriMo – The Challenge to Craft An Emotion Filled Story in 30 Days

NaNo

National November Writing Month, NaNoWriMo, NaNo, Na na na − okay that last one I made up.

Saying NaNoWriMo is awkward, but then the full title is long and the last words end up mumbled. Not that it matters, since any attempt to explain NaNoWriMo to non-writers is useless. I receive the cocked head and confused expression.

The main question asked is, “Why?”

My answer is that it sounds fun. Plus, I recently finished the rough edits of my novel (Yay!) I’m ready to let it sit for a while before I look at it with fresh eyes. A month away will do me some good, so it’s the perfect time to start something new.

I’ve decided to write a prequel to my novel. It will fit the word count and I have the characters ready to go in my mind. I’m excited to get started and I just need to flush out the full plot.

Wish me luck! And good luck to all who are participating this year.

Here are some resources I’ve read to prepare for NaNoWriMo:

NaNoWriMo blog posts:

National November Writing Month

Why You Should Consider Sharing Your Novel As You Go

Roadtrip to NaNo: How Setting Can Act as a Character In Your Novel

Roadtrip to NaNo: Creating 3-D Characters By People Watching

Kristen Lamb’s blog posts:

NaNoWriMo—Training Lean, Mean, Writing Machines

How to Make Sure Your NaNo Project Isn’t a Hot Mess

Fueling the Muse for NaNoWriMo—Part One

Fueling the Muse Part 2—How to Give Your NaNo Story a Beating Heart and a Skeleton

M.J. Wright’s blog posts:

Sixty second writing tips: pushing the NaNo edges

Questions to ask before starting your novel

Write it now: how to make readers feel what you do when writing

How to write a 50,000 word novel in a month

I would I love to hear from you! Let me know about your plans for NaNoWriMo or the conversations you’ve had about it.

Thanks for reading my blog.
A.G. Zalens

 

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Fiction Writing: Prepare Before You Start

Writing a fiction novel is doing something fun and creative, which fulfills the advice to do what you love. Yet, the storms come when a writer starts a novel without the necessary background in place.

This gave me the idea to blog about what I’ve learned during my journey to write a novel and I’ll spread out the steps and how to incorporate them over several posts.

My first step started with the concept.

Every minute spent on the prep and outline of my novel supported me during the process. I developed a complete concept and plot, and I managed the story to the end.

Step One:

CloudsDecide Your Overall Concept

Years ago, my first attempt at writing a novel centered on two characters perfect for story building. After a lot of notes and careful character description, I wrote the first pages. A few hundred words later, I stopped. All the big decisions wrecked my momentum. I never plotted the story and the writing stalled.

To avoid my mistake make certain to craft a concept, which will move the characters to the story’s end.

Answer this question first:

What type of genre will keep me interested while writing thousands of words?

The books we love to read come to our minds. However, a historical suspense, though fun to read, involves a lot of research and strategy. Those who love to read, study, and search history may choose this genre, but if that doesn’t describe you then you might pick a genre you want to research.

Many lists of genres exist ( Book Genres from The Guardian) and you can pick something general or specific. It depends on your approach to the story. A plot that includes the paranormal may need room to evolve and bring in other concepts and creatures. Stories based on a real situation may benefit from a specific genre to keep it on track.

Next, answer this question:

Where and when do I want my characters to live?

Look back at the last question and decide what place you want to research. The place and time you’re willing and eager to devote time and effort on fact-finding.

A town, city, farm, outer space, new universe, new planet, anything you can describe and use to give your characters somewhere to live, visit, or explore. The past, present, or future gives the story something to describe and bring substance to the characters and their journey.

Then answer this question:

What is the purpose of telling this story?

If your story has no purpose than the readers will wonder why they spent so much time reading it. At the end the conclusion should resolve something in the story.

An emotional reaction at the finish gratifies the reader, allows them to find closure in the story, and anticipate the next book. Any novel, which stops with loose-ends and a “to be continued” better conclude at least one main aspect of the story. A hook for the next book in a series only works after the plot’s resolution.

What is your process before you write the first word of a story? Do you have any advice for those who struggle with this?

The next section is character development, and I will write out the way I developed my characters in the next installment blog post.

I hope you enjoyed my post and look forward to talking with you!

Thanks for visiting my blog,

A.G. Zalens